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OSDir.com
  • Docker 1.0
    From the Milestones dept.:
    On March 20, 2013, we released the first version of Docker. After 15 months, 8,741 commits from more than 460 contributors, 2.75 million downloads, over 14,000 “Dockerized” apps, and feedback from 10s of 1000s of users about their experience with Docker, from a single container on a laptop to 1000s in production in the cloud … we’re excited to announce that it’s here: Docker 1.0.

  • Heartbleed Redux: Another Gaping Wound in Web Encryption Uncovered
    From the Electric Boogaloo dept.:
    On Thursday, the OpenSSL Foundation published an advisory warning to users to update their SSL yet again, this time to fix a previously unknown but more than decade-old bug in the software that allows any network eavesdropper to strip away its encryption. The non-profit foundation, whose encryption is used by the majority of the Web’s SSL servers, issued a patch and advised sites that use its software to upgrade immediately.

    The new attack, found by Japanese researcher Masashi Kikuchi, takes advantage of a portion of OpenSSL’s “handshake” for establishing encrypted connections known as ChangeCipherSpec, allowing the attacker to force the PC and server performing the handshake to use weak keys that allows a “man-in-the-middle” snoop to decrypt and read the traffic.

  • The Next Circle of Hell: Unpatchable Systems
    From the This Should be Interesting dept.:
    Microsoft's decision to end support for Windows XP in April was met with a collective gulp by the IT community. For good reason: Approximately 30 percent of all desktop systems continue to run XP despite Microsoft's decision to stop offering security updates. Furthermore, a critical security flaw in Internet Explorer 8 disclosed recently by HP's TippingPoint Division opens the door to remote attacks on XP systems that use IE8.

    But Windows XP is just the tip of an ever-widening iceberg: software and hardware that is unpatchable and unsupportable -- by policy or design. In fact, the trend toward systems and devices that, once deployed, stubbornly "keep on ticking" regardless of the wishes of those who deploy them is fast becoming an IT security nightmare made real, affecting everything from mom-and-pop shops to power stations.

  • Git 2.0.0 Released
    From the Git 'er. dept.:
    The latest feature release Git v2.0.0 is now available at the usual places.

    We had to delay the final release by a week or so because we found a few problems in earlier release candidates (request-pull had a regression that stopped it from showing the "tags/" prefix in "Please pull tags/frotz" when the user asked to compose a request for 'frotz' to be pulled; a code path in git-gui to support ancient versions of Git incorrectly triggered for Git 2.0), which we had to fix in an extra unplanned release candidate.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Core Infrastructure Initiative
    From the Hindsight dept.:
    The Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), a project hosted by The Linux Foundation that enables technology companies, industry stakeholders and esteemed developers to collaboratively identify and fund open source projects that are in need of assistance, today announced five new backers, the first projects to receive funding from the Initiative and the Advisory Board members who will help identify critical infrastructure projects most in need of support.

    CII provides funding for fellowships for key developers to work fulltime on open source projects, security audits, computing and test infrastructure, travel, face-to-face meeting coordination and other support. The Steering Committee, comprised of members of the Initiative, and the Advisory Board of industry stakeholders and esteemed developers, are tasked with identifying underfunded open source projects that support critical infrastructure, and administering the funds through The Linux Foundation.